Tuesday, July 16, 2013

The Gardens at Sunset: An event to support KCCG's schoolyard gardens


Where do strawberries come from? How do tomatoes grow? Children living in urban communities such as ours often have no idea where real food comes from. It’s a sad truth and one that has a very direct connection to our country’s growing childhood obesity epidemic. If you don’t know where to find healthy food, how can you be expected to eat it?
 
Kansas City Community Garden’s (KCCG) Schoolyard Gardens Program promotes and facilitates food gardens in Kansas City area schools to help our children learn about nutrition and healthy eating habits. Just one example is M.E. Pearson Elementary in Kansas City, Kansas, where students in an after-school garden club harvest and eat fresh vegetables and fruits they grow in six raised beds. The school sends extra produce, along with bilingual recipes, home with the students for family meals.  

In an effort to support this and our other valuable programs that serve the lower-income families of Kansas City, KCCG along with honorary chairs Nancy Lee and Jonathan Kemper are hosting the second annual Gardens at Sunset fundraising event:

The Gardens at Sunset
Sunday, September 15, 2013 | 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.
in our extraordinary Children’s Beanstalk Garden
6917 Kensington Avenue, Kansas City, MO 

Guests will savor a beautiful fall evening in the gardens and enjoy delicious hors d’oeuvres full of Kansas City flavor, cocktails, live jazz music and a little friendly competition on our gourmet silent auction. Funds raised from this event will support school, community, and home garden projects that are helping the people of Kansas City get their hands dirty—growing their own produce and living healthier lives.

Tickets for “The Gardens at Sunset” are $75 per person, partially tax-deductible and can be purchased online at www.thegardensatsunset.com. Sponsorship packages also are available.

The Kansas City Community Gardens supports more than 140 local schoolyard gardens throughout KC; plus the nonprofit organization helps more than 1,000 low-income families grow their own healthy fruits and vegetables

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